ALL ABOUT DOGS and CATS   Resource Center for Canine & Feline Lovers
puppy and kitten
Dog Activities - Agility, Sporting and Playing
By Kirsten Cole-MacMurray
and Stephanie Nishimoto

Do you want your dog to be
more active, and to run, jump,
hike, and play alongside you
when you exercise? Getting
active begins way before you
start training your dog on
equipment or on agility
courses. You must ramp up
your daily activity,
interactions, and overall
health of the dog and the
trainer—you!  


See Spot Run teaches you
the basics of canine/owner
fitness, including nutrition,
getting to know fitness
equipment, building a weekly
program...and how to stick
with the program, and more.
Then, the book dives into the
instructions for more than
100 sports, games, and
activities, teaching you the
rules and skills, how to set a
training schedule, how to dive
in and get your paws wet,
and beyond.

See Spot Run: 100
Ways to Work Out with
Your Dog
When you leave your companion at home, absence might notmake your heart grow
fonder. The key is to understand that bored dogs are often destructive dogs.

Dogs are pack animals. They’re loyal and dependent socially upon their ‘pack’ — which is
you when your dog lives in your home!

Your dog has an intense attachment to you. So when you start getting ready to go out
and you’re running around trying to get stuff done, your dog’s ‘sixth sense’ takes over
and tells them that they will soon be alone.  And alone does not sound good to them. In
fact, it sounds downright dreadful.

So dogs howl to let you know they don’t like it. Or follow you around with puppy dog
eyes while you’re getting ready. Your dog may bark all day while you’re gone… cry their
hearts out… chew on things… or who knows what else?

Your happy-go-lucky four-legged friend provides you with constant unconditional love,
devotion, friendship — and even health benefits. (Dogs are shown to bring joy, relieve
stress, encourage exercise, raise morale, boost self-confidence and self-esteem.)
Five Ways to Enhance Your Canine Companion’s Best Health

Your happy-go-lucky four-legged friend provides you with constant unconditional love,
devotion, friendship — and even health benefits. (Dogs are shown to bring joy, relieve
stress, encourage exercise, raise morale, boost self-confidence and self-esteem.)

So naturally, you want to keep your dog as healthy as possible. Here are some tips to
help:

   Feed your dog an appropriate raw diet for their body
. This means high protein with
a few veggies — not a corn or animal by-product based diet of kibble (fake food). Pet
owners and vets have witnessed vast health improvements doing this. Benefits include
proper weight, cleaner teeth, more active and less achy, reduced flea problems, and a
happier disposition.

   
Supplement your dog’s diet with omega-3 oils. If you feed your dog kibble,
supplement with small sardines (the ones canned in water, one sardine per day for toy
breeds, 2-3 sardines for medium dogs and more for large dogs) to supply omega-3 oils.
Alternatively, an organic free-range chicken egg on alternate days adds nutrients and
variety. Reduce his kibble accordingly, or you may find the caloric intake too great.

   
Keep your dog fit. It can add years to your dog’s life, and give your dog a better
quality of life. (Just like it will for you.) Provide at least one opportunity each day for your
dog to get exercise.

   
Provide your dog with chew treats. They provide pleasure, mental and physical
exercise, and make your dog easier to live with. Plus, they help keep your dog’s gums
and teeth healthy. Avoid rawhide, as it provides no nutrition and can cause stomach or
intestinal blockages that can be life-threatening.Also avoid gluten-based treats (due to
potential allergens). Raw bones are best, providing natural glucosamine, chondroitin,
collagen and calcium. Watch your dog while chewing — heavy chewers can destroy a
large knucklebone in a short time, causing a heavy digestive load.

   
Encourage mental health and agility with food-stuffed toys. They provide an
interesting challenge and stimulate your dog’s brain.

Certainly not a replacement for taking them for a walk or run, or playing fetch in your
yard or a park, but it will help distract them from their grief over separation from you.

However, it’s much more than just a distraction.

Think about how dogs lived before they were widely domesticated. They hunted,
foraged, and scavenged for food. They had to work for their food, and chew vigorously
when they found it. No lying around all day for those dogs.

Unfortunately, after dogs became domesticated, they also began to be ‘deserted’ due to
long work hours and commutes, and leisure activities that don’t include them.

Dogs Who Aren’t Bored are Less Destructive!
How well does your dog behave when
you leave him or her to go to work or
play?

Does your dog turn into a wreck…
become hyperactive, or growl or howl?
Or does s/he destroy your home in an
effort to keep occupied while you are
gone?
Keep Your Dog Happy and Active Even  When You
Can't Be There