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Physical Fitness Training With Your Dog

By Crissi Johansson

If your feeling a bit out of shape and perhaps, have been told by your doctor that
you need to lose weight, you might also find that your dog could do with the
exercise too. This is the perfect opportunity for you and your dog to spend time with
each other while both getting into shape at the same time.

Regular exercise will give you and your dog extended, healthier lives. You probably
won't be wishing to run a marathon with your canine pal, and you needn't do so. A
simple walk or jog on regular occasions could be all that's needed to do the job.
When you go out running/walking or jogging with your dog, you are bonding with
the animal as well as keeping your body in shape. Your dog will grow closer and you
will start to talk the same language so to speak.

Just as you will need to be eased into the process of exercise if you haven't done
any for a long period of time, so too will your dog. You can perhaps start out on
sessions of 20 minutes or so, gradually increasing the intensity and time you are
exercising for. Just observe your dog. Does he look shattered? Perhaps you should
call it a day for the moment. If the exercise is kept up regularly, both you and your
dog will soon be running for hours without feeling any strain.

You can start your routines wherever you wish, but always keep in mind safety. You
don't want your dog tearing away towards oncoming traffic or jumping at passers
by. So you may need to have taken your dog to some kind of obedience class prior
to starting your outdoor exercise. These classes will help to teach your dog the basic
codes of conduct in public areas, which will mean that you can do your exercise
without having to worry that your dog is going to terrorize some poor family or
attack another dog. However, you must keep in mind that the older your dog gets
without having the correct behavioral training the more reluctant he will be to
training and his unruly behavior may be hard to overturn. You will need to be able to
get your dog to sit, stay, and come if he is to be good company on your daily
activities.

You need to also take a leash with you at all times and keep your dog on it when
necessary. Going to the park can be the best way to commence training, being a
generally safe spot for your dog free from traffic and so on... Bring along with you
some
doggy bags and some water for you and your dog as required. You'll probably
be able to find a
Dog park if you look around your local area. These are great places
for your dog to socialize. You can also generally find cafes that accept dogs and even
feed them lunch within the radius of these parks. Again, make sure your dog is
trained around food so that he doesn't become aggressive to other dogs as he eats.


Content written by Crissi Johansson of
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Dog Activities - Agility, Sporting and Playing
By Kirsten Cole-MacMurray
and Stephanie Nishimoto

Do you want your dog to be
more active, and to run, jump,
hike, and play alongside you
when you exercise? Getting
active begins way before you
start training your dog on
equipment or on agility
courses. You must ramp up
your daily activity,
interactions, and overall
health of the dog and the
trainer—you!  


See Spot Run teaches you
the basics of canine/owner
fitness, including nutrition,
getting to know fitness
equipment, building a weekly
program...and how to stick
with the program, and more.
Then, the book dives into the
instructions for more than
100 sports, games, and
activities, teaching you the
rules and skills, how to set a
training schedule, how to dive
in and get your paws wet,
and beyond.

See Spot Run: 100
Ways to Work Out with
Your Dog